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Posts Tagged ‘medical assistant

In every medical office there are certain people who keep things running smoothly, even when the doctors or nurses are busy. That person is often the medical assistant, and medical offices of all kinds rely on them.

As a medical assistant, what you’ll do from day to day depends on the type of office you’re working in (physician, optometrist, podiatrist, etc.). But the list can include:

  • Assisting patients
  • Taking x-rays
  • Drawing blood and taking blood pressure
  • Bookkeeping and appointments
  • Sterilizing medical equipment

Because they need to be so versatile, a good medical assistant is highly valued by doctors and nurses alike. And because every day can bring a new challenge, the job is never boring. Some medical assistant jobs require licensing, and almost all require education, like hands-on training from Everest.

You can choose from a variety of programs and specialties to put you on the right path to a rewarding career. Learn more about the medical assistant program at Everest here.

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Want to become a medical assistant? It’s a good choice. America’s health care industry is growing. There’s a strong market for trained medical assistants nationwide. And it’s a fun, challenging field.*

So exactly what does a medical assistant do? As a medical assistant, you may:

  • Prepare patients for examinations
  • Take vital signs like blood pressure, pulse and temperature
  • Draw blood
  • Help doctors during examinations
  • Take patient histories
  • Manage patient files
  • Greet patients, make appointments and process insurance claims

If you are friendly, like working with people and enjoy being part of a team, this could be the job for you! Everest graduates and places more medical assistants than any other school in the country.

* http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/31-9092.00

A typical school day for medical assistant students means practicing for a real job.

Office Work

Patients need to fill out necessary forms when they arrive and before leaving a medical office. You’ll get to practice office procedures with others in your classroom.

Telephone Calls

When the telephone rings in the office, there may be a need to schedule an appointment or gather patient information. Classroom instructors can help you get comfortable with receiving and making telephone calls.

Caring for Patients

Medical assistants often assist patients by taking temperatures and blood pressures, or talking to patients about their symptoms. Learning to care for patients is part of the training students receive each school day.

As you can imagine, there are many things medical assistants can do during a real working day. Contact us today and learn more about training and what a typical school day is like for medical assistant students.

If you’re a medical assistant with the right qualifications, you may find yourself working in a variety of settings including medical centers, medical offices or clinics assisting doctors, performing administrative or clerical work.

Clerical duties may require answering phones, handling mail, communicating with patients, and filing patient information and data entry. Administrative duties may entail scheduling patients for medical procedures, taking blood pressure and assisting other health care professionals.

Medical Assistant Duties

What a medical assistant does may also depend on their qualifications along with the needs of the medical practice they’re employed by. State laws are a benchmark for determining the degree of education required for medical assistants to perform specific tasks.

Licensing may also be a factor in determining what medical assistants may eventually earn. Certified medical assistants, as a result of skills and training, may be able to earn higher salaries than those without the certification.

Washingtonians Still Concerned About Job Security, Despite Signs of Economic Recovery

SEATTLE — May 11, 2011 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — As the economy continues to give mixed signals about recovery, one factor is certain – many Washingtonians are still worried about keeping their job.

Despite an uptick in national and statewide hiring trends during the first quarter of 2011, nearly one-third of Washingtonians are concerned about job security, according to data released today in the 3rd Annual Washington State Workplace Confidence Survey conducted by Harris/Decima on behalf of Everest College.

When asked about the high unemployment impacting the state and country, 30 percent of Washington workers said they were concerned about losing their job. Compared with last year, confidence in job security has not budged in 2011, with nearly the same number of Washington workers (29 percent) concerned about losing their job. One change from last year is that more workers are willing to put in extra hours to keep their job. Compared with 2010, significantly more people in 2011 have considered working longer hours to avoid being laid off (20 percent to 14 percent).

“While recent data indicate that hiring is headed in the right direction, the survey reveals that many people are still anxious about job security,” said Wendy Cullen, vice president of employer development for Everest College. “The last three years have been filled with economic hardships for many in Washington and throughout the country, so it’s natural for workers to be a bit cautious. At Everest, we have found that our career programs are popular because they focus on careers that are in-demand, offer flexibility and have the potential for long-term growth.”

Pay Is Top Stressor
The survey found that workplace anxiety levels in Washington continue to be high with nearly two-thirds (62 percent) of survey respondents claiming they suffer from some form of work-related stress. The top stress factor cited by respondents was pay (27 percent), followed by fear of losing their job (20 percent) and their boss (7 percent). Compared with 2010, significantly less people indicated their boss was causing the most stress at their job (14 percent to 7 percent).

Income is a differentiating factor when it comes to whether or not respondents are stressed at work. Those with household incomes of $80,000 or higher are more likely not to be stressed at work when compared with those whose household income is less than $50,000 (47 percent to 27 percent).

If they lost their job, one-third (35 percent) of respondents said they would consider leaving Washington to search for a new job, with men significantly more likely than women to look for a job outside of the state by a margin of 43 percent to 25 percent.

Meanwhile, half (54 percent) of the respondents said they have considered one of the following: returning to school to enhance their current career (27 percent); a new career in order to make more money (22 percent); or returning to school to train for a new career (22 percent).

“We all know what it feels like to be stressed at work, but that doesn’t mean you should settle for a career that doesn’t make you happy,” Cullen said. “This survey serves as an important reminder to regularly re-evaluate what you want out of your job, set goals and, if necessary, chart a new path.”

“For many workers, career training can open the door to that new path, offering a more rewarding work life. Everest College is really in tune with this concept and can be the solution for many people looking to turn their work life in a positive direction.”

Top Careers For Stability
The following occupations continue to see high demand based on U.S. Department of Labor industry trend information through 2018, according to the 2010-11 Occupational Outlook Handbook:

“Obviously, health care is and will continue to be one of the strongest industries because of the aging population,” said Cullen. “A majority of Everest’s programs are in the health care field, giving our students the opportunity for an in-demand career that can serve as a springboard for more advanced health care careers later.”

By the Numbers: 3rd Annual Washington State Workplace Confidence Survey Fast Facts

  • Fourteen percent of Washingtonians said that someone in their household has lost their job in the past 12 months. Those with a household income of less than $50,000 are significantly more likely than those with a household income of $80,000 or more to have had someone in their household experience a job loss (22 percent to 10 percent).
  • When envisioning their dream jobs, 85 percent of employed Americans living in Washington State said doing something they love was most important, followed by better pay (60 percent).
  • Compared with 2010, more Washingtonians would like to have a good relationship with their boss (52 percent to 43 percent) in their dream job.

About the Survey
The 3rd Annual Washington State Workplace Confidence Survey was conducted by Harris/Decima from March 16 to March 20, 2011. A total of 300 employed residents of Washington State were surveyed by telephone. Results are considered accurate to +/- 5.7 percent 19 times out of 20.

About Everest College
Everest College is part of Corinthian Colleges, Inc., one of the largest post-secondary education companies in North America. Its mission is to prepare students for careers in demand or for advancement in their chosen field. It offers diploma programs and associate, bachelor’s and master’s degrees in a variety of high-demand occupational areas, including health care, transportation technology and maintenance, criminal justice, business, information technology and construction trades. Programs vary by campus. For more information, please visit http://www.Everest.edu.

About Harris/Decima
Harris/Decima is one of North America’s most established names in public opinion and market research, with a 25-year track record of innovation and client satisfaction. Today, they are among the largest full service marketing research organizations in North America. Harris/Decima offers a full slate of custom and syndicated research services, including telephone and on-site interviewing, self-administered mail-back and on-line surveys, as well as qualitative one-on-one executive interviewing and focus groups. Harris/Decima conducts research on public and social policy, program evaluation, employee satisfaction, issue management, marketing, advertising and communications testing and evaluation for a wide range of clients in the public, private, and third party sectors. For more information, please visit http://www.harrisdecima.ca

EDITOR’S NOTE: Wendy Cullen, vice president of employer development for Everest College, is available for interviews to discuss the survey and provide tips on recession-proofing your career. To schedule an interview with Wendy or for more information on the 3rd Annual Washington State Workplace Confidence Survey, please contact Ron Neal or Meg Wilson at PondelWilkinson Inc.: Tel: 310-279-5980; Email: rneal@pondel.com and/or mwilson@pondel.com

MELROSE PARK, Ill. – Feb. 17, 2011 – Deann Fitzgerald of Lake Barrington, Ill., has been appointed president of the new Everest College campus in Melrose Park, Ill. In her position, Fitzgerald will oversee all administrative departments, including admissions, student affairs, educational programs, and community and business relations.

Fitzgerald has more than 16 years of senior leadership experience in education. She most recently served as campus president of Everest College in Merrionette Park, Ill., where she worked for three and a half years. Prior to that, Fitzgerald served as campus vice president of Everest College in Chicago, and vice president of the School of Massage Therapy at Cortiva Institute in Chicago.

“Deann’s extraordinary leadership skills and proven track record of ensuring that students receive a quality educational experience will be a great asset to our new Melrose Park campus,” said Sean Quinn, regional vice president for Everest College’s Midwest campuses. “She will support the campus by fulfilling its mission of educating and helping place students in today’s high-demand occupations.”

Fitzgerald holds a master’s degree in business administration from Olivet Nazarene University in Bourbonnais, Ill., and a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Aurora University in Aurora, Ill.

Everest College – Melrose Park, located at 1101 W. North Avenue, offers a variety of programs, including dental assistant, medical assistant, and medical insurance billing and coding. Classes officially begin Feb. 24 and can accommodate up to 1,200 students.

About Everest College

Everest College provides career-oriented diploma programs in the healthcare, skilled trades and business fields. Everest has more than 100 schools in the U.S. and Canada, and is owned by Corinthian Colleges, Inc., one of the largest post-secondary education companies in North America. For more information, visit www.Everest.edu.

Media Contact: Media may call Tim Young or Alyssa Templeton, of L.C. Williams & Associates (for Everest College), call 312-565-3900 or 800-837-7123, or e-mail tyoung@lcwa.com or atempleton@lcwa.com.

Medical assistant training at any school is meant to provide hands-on training that challenges each student to get involved.

Patricia Lucarelli - Medical Assistant Student Saves Life

Patricia Lucarelli - Medical Assistant Student Saves Life

While medical assistant program coursework is designed to give students the skills and knowledge that enables them to compete for entry-level work on day one of graduation, few students imagine experiencing an event that grants them the opportunity to save a life.

For Patricia Lucarelli, an Everest College medical assistant student at the Portland campus, this became a reality when she was able to use her training to save the life of another.

Instincts and Training Saved the Day

Lucarelli was walking along a city boulevard with her fiancé and another friend when they suddenly noticed a group of people huddled around a man lying unconscious on the ground.

“They (crowd) were in shock, so no one was doing anything,” says Lucarelli.

Her instincts and training immediately kicked in. Checking for signs of life, she realized the man on the ground was still warm even though there was no pulse. The pupils of his eyes were mere pinpoints. Checking his air passage, the Everest medical assistant student began compressions and coached her friend on how and when to breathe into his lungs in the hopes he might regain consciousness.

Soon, there were a few gasps. Checking his pulse again, Lucarelli felt the signs of a faint heartbeat. She continued administering life-saving compressions until the paramedics arrived.

“Later, the paramedics told [him] that he was legally dead and through our quick action, we saved his life,” according to Lucarelli. “I wish I could see [him] standing, talking and walking, but most of all, just to see his bright blue eyes with life in them. What a feeling!”

Her Fast Response Saved a Life

Not every student will experience such a life-changing event. However, Lucarelli received industry-specific training at Everest College in Portland that prepared her to put her skills into rapid action. Her courses included the study of basic medical office practice, anatomy and physiology, medical transcription, medical terminology, medical law and ethics, and more.

Interested in learning more about medical assistant training at Everest College?

Contact us today. Programs and schedules vary by campus.


Everest College Information

Everest provides students with short-term career training in a variety of popular programs*. Our schools offer diplomas and/or degrees in:
Students can also earn online degrees through Everest University Online, a division of Everest University.

For more information about our graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed the program, and other important information, please visit www.everest.edu/disclosures or www.everestonline.edu/disclosures.

*Programs vary by campus.

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