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Archive for the ‘Degree’ Category

bigstock-Line-Of-Police-Cars-3888532If you’ve ever considered a career in law enforcement, the Winter Park Police Department in Winter Park, Florida, has numerous opportunities for interns and volunteers.

As an intern with the department, you’ll be scheduled time with each division of the agency to see how they work on a day-to-day basis. You’d get to shadow offers, detectives, and other staff, ride with patrol, participate in investigations when possible, and even learn the appropriate use of weapons.

Most important, you’d get an exciting, firsthand look into the inner workings of a real, functioning police department. In fact, their current intern, Jason Cole, is a hearing-impaired student pursuing a Criminal Justice degree in South Orlando at Everest University whose dream is to enter law enforcement.

If an internship isn’t right for you, consider volunteering with the department. It’s a fantastic way to find a rewarding experience and to serve your community.

Volunteer and intern positions are available for those who complete a simple application process. Applications are obtained by contacting Officer Randall Morrissey at either 407-599-3562 or by emailing him at rmorrissey@cityofwinterpark.org.

Link: Criminal Justice degree in South Orlando  

For more information about our graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed the program and other important information, please visit our website at www.everest.edu/disclosures

 

#2Remember when you dreamed of being a movie star or professional dancer? Today’s teens have dreams that are rooted in the real world — in health care and IT.

Everest Institute recently surveyed 300 high school students age 14-18, asking which field was most likely to lead to their dream job. The top two choices were health care and information technology, with education coming in third.

“The survey indicates that young people are quite savvy and realistic about the paths to successful employment,” said Ken Sigmon, regional vice president of operations at Everest Institute.

A large majority of those surveyed also agreed that getting good grades and a degree are important for finding that dream job.

Everest offers a variety of career training and degree programs for young people interested in entering the health care and IT industries.

#4_Mouse-With-Book-And-Keyboard-1949101

Anything worthwhile can be challenging, and an online education is no different. But with a little help and the right approach, you can make your online schooling a great experience. Here are a few tips to help you get the most from your online education:

  • Keep in touch. Be sure to keep in touch with your instructor with questions. Everest instructors will give you their email address to make it easy.
  • Print the syllabus. Even though it’s available online, having it printed and on the wall in front of you is a great way to keep track of where you are in class.
  • Set a schedule. Completing assignments on time is very important, so set aside time each day to work on them.
  • Make a list. Write down any upcoming assignments so you’re not caught by surprise.
  • Participate in discussion boards. Remember class participation back in high school or middle school? This is just like that, only online. And it is often a big part of your grade.
  • Read the material. Keep up with your assigned reading material, as you may be quizzed on it or need to write a paper.
  • Use a mobile app. If you have a smartphone or tablet, you can study when you’re on the go using a mobile app. Everest University Online offers a great app for iPhone and Android phones. You can learn about it here.

Remember, getting an education online is a great way to fit school in with a busy schedule. And with a little work, you can set yourself up for success.

The Brookings Institute recently performed a study to find a link between education and unemployment. And they found one. According to their report, cities where more people have a higher education also have more job opportunities.* The reverse was also true; cities with less higher education turned out to have fewer job opportunities.

So what does that mean to you? Education can be the key to a better career and more opportunities. And at Everest, you can pursue a degree in popular fields such as accounting, business, computer information science, criminal justice and paralegal. These are career-focused programs designed to prepare you for jobs in the 21st century economy. Classes are small, instructors are industry professionals and learning is hands on, so you get experience practicing the skills you learn. After graduation, you can get job placement support from Everest’s Career Services professionals.

For more information on associate and bachelor’s degree programs, as well as one-year diploma programs, contact Everest today. Programs and schedules vary by campus.

*Source: Brookings Institute, “Education, Job Openings, and Unemployment in Metropolitan America”

View disclosures here.

Going back to school can be intimidating, especially when you feel like you’re older than all the other students. But have you considered how being a little older might be a good thing? Here’s why:

Maturity. Because of life experience — with jobs, kids or even being part of the PTA — you know how to focus and ask better questions that can help you really get things done. Your maturity gives you the skills you need to be a better student.

Less school burnout. An 18 or 19 year old has likely been going to school nearly their entire life and college can feel like more of the same to these kids. But you’ve had a nice break to recharge and see college as a means to an end versus just another day in classes.

More confidence. You’ll find that teachers are less intimidating to you than an 18 year old. Tests are less stressful because you’ve had years to learn how to manage your time and know what’s worth stressing about.

Your life experience and the wisdom it brings with it set you up for great success, so don’t let your age (or anything) hold you back!

There are 29 million jobs in the U.S. that pay an average of $35,000 per year and higher, and don’t require a bachelor’s degree. Yet, we don’t have enough schools to train people to fill them. This is according to a report by a public policy group at Georgetown University.*

The report lists five ways high school graduates can get the technical skills employers want (without investing four to five years earning a bachelor’s degree):

  • Employer-based training
  • Postsecondary certificates
  • Registered apprenticeships
  • Industry-based certifications
  • Associate degrees

The good news is you can find exactly the type of career training the report recommends from Everest, which offers diploma and associate degree programs in health care, criminal justice, business, accounting, computer information science and paralegal fields. Students can usually complete diploma programs in less than a year, and associate degree programs in about two years.

For more information on programs, schedules and locations of Everest campuses in your area, contact Everest today. Programs and schedules vary by campus.

View disclosures here.

* Source: Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce, and Civic Enterprises http://cew.georgetown.edu/ctefiveways/

Washingtonians Still Concerned About Job Security, Despite Signs of Economic Recovery

SEATTLE — May 11, 2011 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — As the economy continues to give mixed signals about recovery, one factor is certain – many Washingtonians are still worried about keeping their job.

Despite an uptick in national and statewide hiring trends during the first quarter of 2011, nearly one-third of Washingtonians are concerned about job security, according to data released today in the 3rd Annual Washington State Workplace Confidence Survey conducted by Harris/Decima on behalf of Everest College.

When asked about the high unemployment impacting the state and country, 30 percent of Washington workers said they were concerned about losing their job. Compared with last year, confidence in job security has not budged in 2011, with nearly the same number of Washington workers (29 percent) concerned about losing their job. One change from last year is that more workers are willing to put in extra hours to keep their job. Compared with 2010, significantly more people in 2011 have considered working longer hours to avoid being laid off (20 percent to 14 percent).

“While recent data indicate that hiring is headed in the right direction, the survey reveals that many people are still anxious about job security,” said Wendy Cullen, vice president of employer development for Everest College. “The last three years have been filled with economic hardships for many in Washington and throughout the country, so it’s natural for workers to be a bit cautious. At Everest, we have found that our career programs are popular because they focus on careers that are in-demand, offer flexibility and have the potential for long-term growth.”

Pay Is Top Stressor
The survey found that workplace anxiety levels in Washington continue to be high with nearly two-thirds (62 percent) of survey respondents claiming they suffer from some form of work-related stress. The top stress factor cited by respondents was pay (27 percent), followed by fear of losing their job (20 percent) and their boss (7 percent). Compared with 2010, significantly less people indicated their boss was causing the most stress at their job (14 percent to 7 percent).

Income is a differentiating factor when it comes to whether or not respondents are stressed at work. Those with household incomes of $80,000 or higher are more likely not to be stressed at work when compared with those whose household income is less than $50,000 (47 percent to 27 percent).

If they lost their job, one-third (35 percent) of respondents said they would consider leaving Washington to search for a new job, with men significantly more likely than women to look for a job outside of the state by a margin of 43 percent to 25 percent.

Meanwhile, half (54 percent) of the respondents said they have considered one of the following: returning to school to enhance their current career (27 percent); a new career in order to make more money (22 percent); or returning to school to train for a new career (22 percent).

“We all know what it feels like to be stressed at work, but that doesn’t mean you should settle for a career that doesn’t make you happy,” Cullen said. “This survey serves as an important reminder to regularly re-evaluate what you want out of your job, set goals and, if necessary, chart a new path.”

“For many workers, career training can open the door to that new path, offering a more rewarding work life. Everest College is really in tune with this concept and can be the solution for many people looking to turn their work life in a positive direction.”

Top Careers For Stability
The following occupations continue to see high demand based on U.S. Department of Labor industry trend information through 2018, according to the 2010-11 Occupational Outlook Handbook:

“Obviously, health care is and will continue to be one of the strongest industries because of the aging population,” said Cullen. “A majority of Everest’s programs are in the health care field, giving our students the opportunity for an in-demand career that can serve as a springboard for more advanced health care careers later.”

By the Numbers: 3rd Annual Washington State Workplace Confidence Survey Fast Facts

  • Fourteen percent of Washingtonians said that someone in their household has lost their job in the past 12 months. Those with a household income of less than $50,000 are significantly more likely than those with a household income of $80,000 or more to have had someone in their household experience a job loss (22 percent to 10 percent).
  • When envisioning their dream jobs, 85 percent of employed Americans living in Washington State said doing something they love was most important, followed by better pay (60 percent).
  • Compared with 2010, more Washingtonians would like to have a good relationship with their boss (52 percent to 43 percent) in their dream job.

About the Survey
The 3rd Annual Washington State Workplace Confidence Survey was conducted by Harris/Decima from March 16 to March 20, 2011. A total of 300 employed residents of Washington State were surveyed by telephone. Results are considered accurate to +/- 5.7 percent 19 times out of 20.

About Everest College
Everest College is part of Corinthian Colleges, Inc., one of the largest post-secondary education companies in North America. Its mission is to prepare students for careers in demand or for advancement in their chosen field. It offers diploma programs and associate, bachelor’s and master’s degrees in a variety of high-demand occupational areas, including health care, transportation technology and maintenance, criminal justice, business, information technology and construction trades. Programs vary by campus. For more information, please visit http://www.Everest.edu.

About Harris/Decima
Harris/Decima is one of North America’s most established names in public opinion and market research, with a 25-year track record of innovation and client satisfaction. Today, they are among the largest full service marketing research organizations in North America. Harris/Decima offers a full slate of custom and syndicated research services, including telephone and on-site interviewing, self-administered mail-back and on-line surveys, as well as qualitative one-on-one executive interviewing and focus groups. Harris/Decima conducts research on public and social policy, program evaluation, employee satisfaction, issue management, marketing, advertising and communications testing and evaluation for a wide range of clients in the public, private, and third party sectors. For more information, please visit http://www.harrisdecima.ca

EDITOR’S NOTE: Wendy Cullen, vice president of employer development for Everest College, is available for interviews to discuss the survey and provide tips on recession-proofing your career. To schedule an interview with Wendy or for more information on the 3rd Annual Washington State Workplace Confidence Survey, please contact Ron Neal or Meg Wilson at PondelWilkinson Inc.: Tel: 310-279-5980; Email: rneal@pondel.com and/or mwilson@pondel.com


Everest College Information

Everest provides students with short-term career training in a variety of popular programs*. Our schools offer diplomas and/or degrees in:
Students can also earn online degrees through Everest University Online, a division of Everest University.

For more information about our graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed the program, and other important information, please visit www.everest.edu/disclosures or www.everestonline.edu/disclosures.

*Programs vary by campus.

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